Video Voter

A Guide to California’s Ballot Measures

Video Voter Series splash screen

Californians are facing decisions on 17 statewide ballot propositions. The Rose Institute of State and Local Government at Claremont McKenna College has produced an online “Video Voter” series to give voters an objective, easy-to-understand guide to these propositions. In brief 2-3 minute videos, we present each measure’s basic purpose, major supporters and opponents, and arguments pro and con. We hope these videos help you make informed voting decisions.

Subtitles are available for each video in English and Spanish.
To access the subtitles, click on the YouTube video, click on “settings” and select “subtitles” either in English or Spanish.

Hay subtítulos para cada vídeo en inglés y español.
Para acceder a los subtítulos, haz clic en el vídeo YouTube, haz clic en “settings,” y elija “subtitles” en inglés o español.

List of Videos


Proposition 51: School Bond

Overview
Proposition 51 would authorize $9 billion in bonds to fund the construction and renovation of facilities at the state’s K-12 schools and community colleges. (Grace Lee)

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Proposition 52: Hospital Fees

Overview
Proposition 52 would lock in the state’s current hospital fee program, which helps California secure federal Medicaid funds. (Tyler Finn)

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Proposition 53: Voting on Revenue Bonds

Overview
Proposition 53 would give voters the right to vote on state-issued revenue bonds totaling more than $2 billion for a project, such as the state’s high-speed rail project. (Skip Wiltshire-Gordon)

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Proposition 54: Legislative Procedures

Overview
Proposition 54 would require the Legislature to publish bills online for 72 hours before final votes and expand access to audiovisual recordings of proceedings. (Wesley Edwards)

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Proposition 55: Income Tax

Overview
Proposition 55 would extend the temporary increase in the state personal income tax for high earners voters approved in 2012 and provide additional money to public education and health care programs. (Grace Lee)

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Proposition 56: Tobacco Tax

Overview
Prop 56 would raise the tax on all tobacco products in California by $2. It would use the most of the new revenues to fund health care and smoking prevention programs. (Alec Lopata)

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Proposition 57: Criminal Sentences

Overview
Proposition 57 would give nonviolent felons greater opportunities for early release and parole, and give judges, rather than prosecutors, power to decide whether to try juveniles in adult court. (Tyler Finn)

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Proposition 58: Bilingual Education

Overview
Prop. 58 would make it easier for public schools to provide bilingual education programs. It would overturn Prop. 227, the English-only measure voters approved in 1998. (Bryn Miller)

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Proposition 59: Instruction on Campaign Finance

Overview
Proposition 59 is an advisory question asking voters whether they support the reversal of the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision in Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission (2010) and related court rulings. (Zachary Wong)

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Proposition 60: Condoms in Adult Films

Overview
Proposition 60 would place new regulations on California’s adult film industry, including a requirement that performers wear condoms and other protective devices during filming. (Wesley Edwards)

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Proposition 61: Prescription Drug Pricing

Overview
Prop. 61 would require California to buy certain drugs at prices no higher than the prices paid by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. (Bryn Miller)

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Proposition 62: Death Penalty Abolition

Overview
Proposition 62 would abolish the death penalty in California and make the state’s most severe sentence life in prison without possibility of parole. (Ellen Lempres)

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Proposition 63: Gun and Ammunition Control

Overview
Proposition 63 would establish new, more restrictive regulations on guns and ammunition in California. (Alec Lopata)

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Proposition 64: Legalization of Marijuana

Overview
Proposition 64 would legalize marijuana for general use in California and would tax and regulate the marijuana industry. (Zachary Wong)

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Proposition 65: Carry-Out Bag Revenues

Overview
Proposition 65 would use proceeds from state-mandated sales of reusable bags to fund environmental programs. (Tamara Skinner)

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Proposition 66: Death Penalty Enhancement

Overview
Proposition 66 would make it easier for the state to enforce the death penalty. It competes with Proposition 62, which would abolish capital punishment in California. (Ellen Lempres)

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Proposition 67: Plastic Bag Ban

Overview
Proposition 67 would prohibit stores from providing customers single-use plastic bags and would require stores to charge customers a minimum of 10 cents for each paper or reusable bag. (Tamara Skinner)

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The Rose Institute would like to sincerely thank these individuals for their translation services:
Lanie Corrigan, Nick Federochko, Professor Esther Hernandez, Bryn Miller, Alejandro Salvador, Sonia Skinner, Professor Raquel Vega-Duran, Edgar Warnholtz

 


For additional information about California’s ballot measures, please reference the League of Women’s VotersVoters Edge California.

 

Watch the 2014 Video Voter Series